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Office: 180 FOB
Phone: 801-422-2037
Email: jaren_pope@byu.edu

Personal We​bsite


 


Curr​iculum Vitae

Expertise                         Environmental Economics,
Urban Economics

Jaren C. Pope​​

Associate Profes​​sor

Education

PhD, North Carolina State University, 2006

MA, North Carolina State University, 2004

BA, Brigham Young University, 2001

Research and Professional Experience

Jaren Pope is an Associate Professor in the Department of Economics at Brigham Young University.  Jaren's primary research area is in environmental and urban economics.  Much of his work has been focused on using property value information and quasi-experimental hedonic techniques to understand how households value environmental and urban amenities.  He also does work related to behavioral economics and the economics of education.  Jaren has conducted funded research for the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In his free time he enjoys doing activities with his wife and three daughters and serving the community through his church. He also enjoys playing sports including basketball, tennis, mountain biking, and slalom waterskiing.

Recent Publications

Benjamin Keys, Devin Pope, Jaren C. Pope (forthcoming). Failure to Refinance. ​Journal of Financial Economics.

Chris Bruegge, Carmen Carrion-Flores, Jaren C. Pope (2016). Does the Housing Market Value Energy Efficient Homes? Evidence from the Energy Star Program. Regional Science and Urban Economics.

Meghan Busse, Devin Pope, Jaren C. Pope, Jorge Silva-Risso (2015). The Psychological Effect of Weather on Car Purchases. Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Devin Pope, Just Sydnor, Jaren C. Pope (2015). Focal Points and Bargaining in Housing Markets​. Games and Economic Behavior.

Devin G. Pope, Jaren C. Pope (2015). When Walmart Comes to Town: Always Low Housing Prices? Always?Journal of Urban Economics.

Nicolai V. Kuminoff, Jaren C. Pope (2014). Do "Capitalization Effects" for Public Goods Reveal the Public's Willingness to Pay?International Economic Review.

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